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Social Security Number (SSN)
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Social Security Number (SSN)

  1. What is a SSN?
  2. SSN stands for Social Security Number. A SSN is a nine-digit number that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires of all individuals to identify their tax accounts with the IRS.

    The SSN is one of two (2) identification numbers assigned by the IRS which are known collectively as Taxpayer Identification Numbers (TIN). The other identifier is the Employer Identification Number (EIN).

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  3. Why is it necessary to supply a SSN?
  4. The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (DCIA) requires the FCC to collect this information. Congress enacted the DCIA to improve collection of delinquent government debts. As a result of the DCIA, the FCC and other executive agencies collect the SSN from each individual or organization doing business with a federal agency, including applicants for, or recipients of, a federal license or permit.

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  5. What if my entity does not have a SSN?
  6. In the unlikely event your entity does not have a SSN, you will be permitted to indicate the reason it does not. The options include: foreign entities, entities that have applied but not yet received their SSN from the IRS, or one of the few entities exempted from having a SSN by the IRS.

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  7. Will anybody see my SSN?
  8. When registering as in individual, the Social Security Number is confidential and cannot be viewed by the public. However, an Employer Identification Number or a Social Security Number submitted as an Employer Identification Number via the Business Registration Form is public information and can be viewed as such.

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Employer Identification Number (EIN)
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Employer Identification Number (EIN)

  1. What is an EIN?
  2. EIN stands for Employer Identification Number. An EIN is a nine-digit number that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires of all businesses and other employers to identify their tax accounts with the IRS.

    The EIN is one of two (2) identification numbers assigned by the IRS which are known collectively as Taxpayer Identification Numbers (TIN). The other identifier is the Social Security Number (SSN).

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  3. Why is it necessary to supply an EIN?
  4. The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (DCIA) requires the FCC to collect this information. Congress enacted the DCIA to improve collection of delinquent government debts. As a result of the DCIA, the FCC and other executive agencies collect the EIN from each individual or organization doing business with a federal agency, including applicants for, or recipients of, a federal license or permit.

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  5. I am with a not-for-profit organization (or state/local government agency), and I do not believe we have an EIN. What should I use?
  6. It is unlikely that your organization or agency has no EIN. All employers, including state and local government agencies and non-profit organizations, have an EIN. If you do not know your EIN, you can usually obtain this information from your payroll or accounting department.

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  7. What if my entity does not have an EIN?
  8. In the unlikely event your entity does not have an EIN, you will be permitted to indicate the reason it does not. The options include: foreign entities, entities that have applied but not yet received their EIN from the IRS, or one of the few entities exempted from having an EIN by the IRS.

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  9. Will anybody see my EIN?
  10. If you are a registering as a business, the Employer Identification Number is public information. If you are an individual registering as a business and providing your Social Security Number (SSN) as your EIN, it will also be viewable by the public, but will be referred to as an EIN, not a SSN.

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Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN)
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Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN)

  1. What is a TIN?
  2. TIN stands for taxpayer identification number. A TIN is a nine-digit number that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires of all individuals, businesses, and other employers to identify their tax accounts with the IRS.

    For an individual, the TIN is the personís Social Security Number (SSN).

    For employers, including state and local government agencies and non-profit organizations, the TIN is the IRS-issued Employer Identification Number (EIN).

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  3. Why is it necessary to supply a TIN?
  4. The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (DCIA) requires the FCC to collect this information. Congress enacted the DCIA to improve collection of delinquent government debts. As a result of the DCIA, the FCC and other executive agencies collect the TIN from each individual or organization doing business with a federal agency, including applicants for, or recipients of, a federal license or permit.

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  5. I am with a not-for-profit organization (or state/local government agency), and I do not believe we have a TIN. What should I use?
  6. It is unlikely that your organization or agency has no TIN. It probably has an Employer Identification Number (EIN). All employers, including state and local government agencies and non-profit organizations, have an EIN. If you do not know your EIN, you can usually obtain this information from your payroll or accounting department.

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  7. What if my entity does not have a TIN?
  8. In the unlikely event your entity does not have a TIN, you will be permitted to indicate the reason it does not. The options include: foreign entities, entities that have applied but not yet received their TIN from the IRS, or one of the few entities exempted from having a TIN by the IRS.

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  9. Will anybody see my TIN?
  10. The answer depends on whether you registered as a business, using an IRS-issued Employer Identification Number as your TIN, or you registered as an individual, using a Social Security Number as your TIN. A Social Security Number is confidential and cannot be viewed by the public. However, an Employer Identification Number is public information.

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